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Review: Increase Decrease

Review: Increase Decrease post image

Judith Durant has made this easy for you. She's painstakingly gone through and documented ninety-nine possible methods of increases and decreases, just for you.

Review: Kirsten Kapur Shawl Book One

Review: Kirsten Kapur Shawl Book One post image

First, the really encouraging thing about this book is that it's clearly labled "Shawl Book One," which implies there's going to be a shawl book two at some point, and maybe a third and a fourth ... all of which is great news, because Kirsten designs some really beautiful shawls.

Review: Wanderlust

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Forty-six patterns in one book? When you consider that most books seem to range between 12-20 patterns, the fact that this book has nearly 50 is astounding.

Review: Faux Taxidermy Knits

Review: Faux Taxidermy Knits post image

What are you to do if you love the look of a fur wrap, or long to hang a moose head on your wall? Well, if you're a knitter ... you make one yourself.

Review: Botanical Knits 1 & 2

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It was only as I started writing the review for the new "Botanical Knits 2" that I realized that I'd never actually reviewed the original, "Botanical Knits," even though it's graced my shelves for almost a year now.

The fact that I'd neglected that comes as a shock because both these books are lovely, filled with sweaters, shawls, mittens, gloves, hats, and socks that I would love to have.

Review: Pick Your Stitch, Build Your Blanket post image

She says in her introduction that she often recommends the 365 Knitting Stitches a Year Perpetual Calendar to the customers of her yarn shop, but that, “a vast number of knitters don’t know how to adapt and use these stitch patterns to actually knit an afghan. "

Review: Sock Yarn Shawls II

Review: Sock Yarn Shawls II post image

We all love sock yarn, right? I mean, I can’t be the only one with a stash that—let’s face it—is never going to completely turn into socks. It’s just all so pretty and tempting, though, and so we pick up a skein here, a skein there, and next thing you know …

Um, right. Lots of yarn.

So what do you do? Well, this book is a good place to start. Not satisfied with her first book (Sock Yarn Shawls), Jen Lucas is back with more.

Review: Knitting Stories

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To be honest, I hadn't planned on reading every essay in this book before writing this review. I thought I would dip in and read some of them, but then save the rest for later, after getting the review posted in a timely manner ... and then I found myself just sitting at my desk, reading, unable to stop.

Review: From Folly Cove

Review: From Folly Cove post image

The collection from Julia Farwell-Clay gets its name from the Folly Cove Designers, a group, she says, "of mostly women who collaborated to hand print textiles in Gloucester, Massachusetts, beginning in the 1940s."

Review: 2015 Crafter’s market

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This is a fabulous reference book. Most people know at least some of the shows and markets available for their own particular niche. They might know about online communities to help spread the word, but nobody knows all of them. (Because, really, is that even possible?) A complete resource that tells you about shows you didn't know about is going to be more than just a little helpful.

Review: Rustic Modern Knits

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Billed as having “23 sophisticated designs,” you know right away that this collection isn’t going to be just standard sweater shapes.

Review: No-Sew Knits

Review: No-Sew Knits post image

A new book from Kristen TenDyke (author of Finish-Free Knits), this time focusing on handknit sweaters that don’t require you to sew anything together.

Review: Modern Country Knits

Review: Modern Country Knits post image

Having just come from a trunk show, I can tell you that the designs are just as gorgeous in person as they are in the pages of the book.

Review: First Frost

Review: First Frost post image

The theme here is "folk" and not specifically "Scandinavia," but in effect it's much the same in this collection of lovely patterns.